Pink Elephants & In the Dark
by Louise Sass

One-off prints executed by hand with reactive dye on cotton textile.



Pink Elephants and In the Dark are overprints. They were created using a technique where a colour scale is created by printing overlapping layers of the three primary colours, red, yellow and blue. In some of her textile prints Louise Sass utilizes a more extensive colour scale; exploring effects of light and colour by combining the three primary colours, with black to produce varying levels of brightness. This process of applying several rounds of colour to the fabric produces great nuance and intensity.
Both works are one-off prints executed by hand with reactive dye on cotton textile, dyeing the material with water-soluble, transparent colour. The thread creates a texture in the textile, conditioning the colour rendition of the fabric. Not everything is possible, but the process pushes the limits, showing through in the completed work.

These investigations constitute the starting point for a series of one-off textile prints, including ‘Mother of Pearl’ which was featured in MINDCRAFT 11. During a stay in Japan Louise Sass studied the significance of the interstice as a dynamically spatial element. Hence her artistic dialogue with colour and the interplay of overlaps and displacements in the interstice are central to her current works, of which Pink Elephants and In the Dark are interesting examples.

Louise Sass’ works are often characterised by a certain dualism. They display both rigour and risk; control coupled with elements of experimental intuition. The analytical studies of colour and dye and the use of simple, geometric elements are carefully composed, as is the systematic combination of patterns, all coexisting with a principle of randomness. For several years she has explored compositions of rhythmic sequences carried out as one-off textile prints, site-specific work, lithographs, paintings, collages and industrially produced interior textiles. This has resulted in a personal alphabet of form and colour, which, in principle, lends itself to a wide range of different materials and scales.

Louise Sass has exhibited extensively, including solo exhibitions at Designmuseum Danmark, Copenhagen 2012 and gallery Inger Molin in Stockholm in 2000, 2005 and 2009 and the Danish Design Centre in Copenhagen 2001. She also took part in the Biennale for Crafts and Design at Trapholt in 2007, was represented at the exhibition ‘The best from 100 years – 100 donations from Friends of the Danish Museum of Art & Design 1910-2010′ at Designmuseum Danmark in Copenhagen, 2010-11 and took part in MINDCRAFT11 in Milan. In 2003-4 she carried out a site specific work for the Serafen Supportive housing complex in Stockholm for Stockholm Arts Council, Sweden. In 1998 she received the Söderberg Award, Scandinavia’s largest craft and design award.

In addition, she has received the Danish Arts Foundation’s three-year working grant (2004-2007), and at the 5th International Textile Competition in Kyoto, Japan in 1997 she received the ITF-Industrial Techniques Award for the one-off print “Linear Stack”, which was later developed into the home furnishing textile “Rago” and put into production by Kvadrat A/S.

Louise Sass, b. 1965, textile and visual artist. Graduated in 1991 from The Danish Design School (now The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – The School of Design).

Pink Elephants & In the Dark - by Louise Sass
Photo credit: 2017 © Danish Crafts / jeppegudmundsen.com

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Ash <br>by Thomas Bentzen
Papercuts <br>by Louise Campbell
Hook <br>by Line Depping
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Beetle Chair <br>by GamFratesi
All Good Things Come in Threes <br>by Peter Johansen
Field of Interference <br>by Kaori Juzu
Poet’s Book Hanger <br>by Jakob Jørgensen
Georg <br>by Christina Liljenberg Halstrøm
Space Meter <br>by Eske Rex
Pink Elephants & In the Dark <br>by Louise Sass
Frieze P7 <br>by Bente Skjøttgaard
Fictile 12.1 <br>by Anne Tophøj
Tumblers & Plates <br>by Tora Urup
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